The guernsey literary and potato peel society book review

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the guernsey literary and potato peel society book review

Review: The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer - Telegraph

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The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society - from book to screen

The zany title of Mary Ann Shaffer's first and, alas, last novel derives from an invented book club on the island of Guernsey in the second world.

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

When Guernsey farmer Dawsey Adams finds Juliet's name in a used book and invites articulate—and not-so-articulate—neighbors to write Juliet with their stories, the book's epistolary circle widens, putting Juliet back in the path of war stories. The occasionally contrived letters jump from incident to incident—including the formation of the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society while Guernsey was under German occupation—and person to person in a manner that feels disjointed. But Juliet's quips are so clever, the Guernsey inhabitants so enchanting and the small acts of heroism so vivid and moving that one forgives the authors Shaffer died earlier this year for not being able to settle on a single person or plot. Juliet finds in the letters not just inspiration for her next work, but also for her life—as will readers. View Full Version of PW.

The memorable title of Shaffer's first and sadly last novel is the name of a war-time book club, invented by a group of Guern-sey villagers stopped by a German patrol for breaking curfew. Posthumously published, and completed by her niece, this epistolary novel revolves around the post-war correspondence between an English writer, Juliet, fascinated by life in occupied Guernsey, and a local pig farmer. Shaffer's writing, with its self-deprecating humour and jaunty stylishness, is a heart-warmingly nostalgic journey into another age. You can find our Community Guidelines in full here. Want to discuss real-world problems, be involved in the most engaging discussions and hear from the journalists?

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Mary Ann Shaffer's first and only novel opens in London in , and could scarcely, it seems, be more English. Yet its author was an American.
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December 12, Reading them, writing them, selling them, binding them — we are not picky. The debut novel by the late Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows is written as a series of letters that tells the history of a small group of Channel Islanders during five years of Nazi occupation.

T he zany title of Mary Ann Shaffer's first and, alas, last novel derives from an invented book club on the island of Guernsey in the second world war. The club is invented by the resourceful character Elizabeth McKenna, who, bumping into a German patrol after curfew with a crowd of revellers, makes the society up on the spot. In reality, the tipsy party had been consuming forbidden roast pig at Amelia Maugery's. This is less a historical novel than a bibliophilic jeu d'esprit by an ex-librarian and bookseller, posthumously published, and completed by her niece Annie Barrows. A novel in letters about books, bibliophiles, publishers, authors and readers, it centres on an imagined post-occupation Guernsey.

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  1. Onclasgasty says:

    Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

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